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Root canaled tooth is painful to touch

User Level:
Patient
Posted by: hypo89  (9 years ago)
Hello Doc!

I started to feel a sudden sharp pain and pressure on the bottom part of one of my front bottom teeth. I also feel pain when I press against the gum around the tooth and when I breathe in air. Lately, I have felt a dull throbbing pain in the entire tooth and a little discomfort on the roof of my mouth. I feel like the tooth is getting loose because my gums have receded slightly.

I went to the dentist, after taking some x-rays he said the tooth got decayed underneath and I would need a root canal treatment. After the root canal treatment, I got a crown put in. Two months after, the tooth with the crown is very painful whenever it is being touched or if something hard like toothbrush or spoon bumps against it. It becomes more painful when I floss it. I've got no pain on the gum line, only on the crowned tooth. It also
hurts when I press it up, tap or wiggle it. I went back to the dentist who performed the root canal and nothing showed up on the x-ray. Does anyone
know what the problem might be? Will this pain go away? Thanks in advance for your help.
User Level:
Student
Posted by: mdhola  (9 years ago)
Well, postoperative pain usually goes away in a week. One reason can be high crown on the root canal treated tooth. I am not sure who made your crown (endodontist/ general dentist) but make appointment with him and see if there is any high spots on the crown they just placed.

Other possibility might be leakage of saliva under the crown and it can be because of a crown not cemented well.

Few other possibilities might be deep pocket in gum or root fracture. However, based on symptoms only I think that's probably not the reason.
I would particularly pay more attention on high spots on cemented crown.
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