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Pain in tooth that was shaved down for bite adjustment.

User Level:
Patient
Posted by: KBinMI  (4 years ago)
I had a permanent crown put on one of my lower molars (#30) in December, and my dentist shaved down the healthy opposing upper molar to fix the bite (the crown was way too high when it was first put in, and apparently shaving down only the crown couldn't get the bite to where it needed to be). While my dentist was shaving the healthy tooth I could feel some sensitivity, but she insisted that she only took off a bit of enamel and that it should cause me no lasting problems.

It has been 2+ months and there is still significant pain in that tooth when I'm eating. Sometimes it's so bad that I can't chew on that side of my mouth. Certain foods, such as fresh pineapple, cause so much pain that I simply avoid them now. The other day I had a bout of stomach flu and I vomited several times, and the stomach acid seems to have made the situation even worse. I can barely manage to eat even soft foods now. I have been using Sensodyne toothpaste along with a prescription fluoride toothpaste, but it doesn't seem to be enough.

I'm asking for advice here because I am seriously questioning the competence of my dentist. I'm hoping to get some reassurance that this situation can be resolved with something as simple as a filling. I'd really like to avoid a crown & root canal treatment on a tooth that was perfectly healthy to begin with. I'm also faced with the decision of going back to the same dentist to get the work covered for free (but taking the risk that she'll make the situation even worse), or going to someone else and eating the copay.
User Level:
Dentist
I had a permanent crown put on one of my lower molars (#30) in December, and my dentist shaved down the healthy opposing upper molar to fix the bite (the crown was way too high when it was first put in, and apparently shaving down only the crown couldn't get the bite to where it needed to be). While my dentist was shaving the healthy tooth I could feel some sensitivity, but she insisted that she only took off a bit of enamel and that it should cause me no lasting problems.

It has been 2+ months and there is still significant pain in that tooth when I'm eating. Sometimes it's so bad that I can't chew on that side of my mouth. Certain foods, such as fresh pineapple, cause so much pain that I simply avoid them now. The other day I had a bout of stomach flu and I vomited several times, and the stomach acid seems to have made the situation even worse. I can barely manage to eat even soft foods now. I have been using Sensodyne toothpaste along with a prescription fluoride toothpaste, but it doesn't seem to be enough.

I'm asking for advice here because I am seriously questioning the competence of my dentist. I'm hoping to get some reassurance that this situation can be resolved with something as simple as a filling. I'd really like to avoid a crown & root canal treatment on a tooth that was perfectly healthy to begin with. I'm also faced with the decision of going back to the same dentist to get the work covered for free (but taking the risk that she'll make the situation even worse), or going to someone else and eating the copay.


It is nearly always a bad idea to reduce the chewing surface of a natural tooth because a crown really needs adjustment. Sometimes we do it when very little adjustment is needed, or where the opposing tooth is supererupted. It is hard to imagine your dentist reduced so much as to cause the pain you are talking about. Perhaps the tooth has a fracture.
Posted 4 years ago
User Level:
Patient
Posted by: KBinMI  (4 years ago)
Thanks for the response. I am 100% certain that the pain in the tooth is a direct result of the the reduction she performed. It is sensitive only in that area where some material was removed, and the tooth was perfectly fine before I had the work done. Based on what you have said, it sounds like my dentist doesn't have a clue what she's doing. I am very upset, because not only do I have to live with this pain, but the natural contour of the tooth has been ruined. Both the crown and the opposing tooth surfaces are very flat, which makes it difficult to chew food on that side of my mouth. I'm starting to wonder if I should consider a malpractice suit.
User Level:
Patient
Posted by: joy2joi  (2 months ago)
Hi KBinMI, what happened in your situation? Did you consider a malpractice suit?
User Level:
Patient
Posted by: joy2joi  (2 months ago)
Thanks for the response. I am 100% certain that the pain in the tooth is a direct result of the the reduction she performed. It is sensitive only in that area where some material was removed, and the tooth was perfectly fine before I had the work done. Based on what you have said, it sounds like my dentist doesn't have a clue what she's doing. I am very upset, because not only do I have to live with this pain, but the natural contour of the tooth has been ruined. Both the crown and the opposing tooth surfaces are very flat, which makes it difficult to chew food on that side of my mouth. I'm starting to wonder if I should consider a malpractice suit.

Hi KBinMI, what happened in your situation? Did your tooth get better? Did you file a malpractice suit against the dentist? I'm in similar situation.
User Level:
Patient
Posted by: joy2joi  (2 months ago)
Thanks for the response. I am 100% certain that the pain in the tooth is a direct result of the the reduction she performed. It is sensitive only in that area where some material was removed, and the tooth was perfectly fine before I had the work done. Based on what you have said, it sounds like my dentist doesn't have a clue what she's doing. I am very upset, because not only do I have to live with this pain, but the natural contour of the tooth has been ruined. Both the crown and the opposing tooth surfaces are very flat, which makes it difficult to chew food on that side of my mouth. I'm starting to wonder if I should consider a malpractice suit.

Hi KBinMI, what happened in your situation? Did your tooth get better? Did you file a malpractice suit against the dentist? I'm in similar situation.
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